B

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
E

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
Y

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
O

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
Ğ

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
L

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
U

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
M

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
U

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
N

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
I

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
C

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
I

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
P

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
A

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
L

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
I

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
T

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
Y

All Colors of Beyoğlu...
BEYOĞLU GUIDE

Piyale Paşa Mosque

Piyale Mehmet Paşa had a complex made up of a mosque, medresah, tekke, children’s school, tomb, marketplace, Turkish bath and a sebil built in the valley behind Kasımpaşa in 1570s for opening a totally inhabited rural section to settlement. Only the mosque and the tomb have survived until today.
The fact that the building was built in the period of Sinan is never an indication that Sinan had any contribution to this complex. We can say that in Piyale Paşa, we are facing the phenomenon transformed into an architectural message concentrating in a structure well beyond individuality, of an upsurge of an imperial architect whose identity is unknown against the institutional identity.
The design has moved outside the known typology already at the design phase with the addition of the two-storey side mahfils seen frequently in Sinan period, to the traditional multi-pedestal, multi-domed (Ulucami) pattern. The difference comes not just from the elimination of the large heavy stone pedestals bearing the domes being replaced by thin, long, monoblock granite pillars, but also from the fact that the side mahfils were covered with vaults which are predominant on side façades with their pointed arched frontons. It may be seen as a controversial, static and aesthetical interpretation that the pillars covering all structural axes of the kibleh wall are projected prominently, transformed into heavy buttresses of an ordinary retaining wall.
The richness introduced to the exterior by the architect in his original design may only be conceived if one considers the twenty-eight tekke and seventeen medresah cells forming the yard and the revak in front of them together with the double revak around the main mass and the two storey outer wings.
Although all these may be seen as an exterior design, the functional solution of which have not been perfected, this privileged structure of the classical Ottoman architecture which entails many other problems requires  careful attention.

Eurocities UCLG-MEWA